Patriot Fire Defense

Call for service or quote: 321-751-0777

Blog

Used Toys Needed For Families In Need

Used Toys Needed For Families In Need 321-751-0777

Patriot Fire Defense collects used toys from families every year (cleans and sterilized them) then hands them out to various non-profit charities in the Brevard area..... so that Brevard families with children in need can have something under the tree this Christmas.If you have a toy that is lying around and you are looking to get it out of the home then please consider giving it to an organization that assists kids in having a cheerful Christmas, despite their poverty level.Most of our toys go to Grandparents Raising Grandkids, local churches and small day care centers for families that need government assistance.If you would like us to pick up anything please call or text at anytime.....321-313-1226!All of us at Patriot Fire Defense hope that everyone has an amazing holiday season this year!www.patriotfiredefense.com www.patriotfiresystems.com


Thank You Military

Today is Memorial Day....a day that we should stop our busy lives and reflect on those who have given their life to protect the freedoms that we take for granted. On this Memorial Day enjoy your family and cherish your friendships and reflect on those individuals who lost their lives so that we can live in a country that protects the freedoms that we so love.  


No Mess Fire Extinguisher

Protect Delicate Items - Use Co2 Your home has many items that are sensitive to ABC dry chemical. Televisions, computers, kitchen appliances, furniture, clothes, and important documents, just to name a few. Let's say you have a stove-top fire and use the dry-chemical extinguisher in the kitchen. The fine mist blasting out of  the extinguisher  will get carried into adjacent rooms, settle on everything in its path. Once that dry chemical hits 70 degrees, it begins to break down the properties of everything it is in contact with, including metal, fabric and paper. This is why we recommend using a C02 in certain areas of the home..... The CO2 extinguisher works well on a flammable liquids or an electrical fire - Types B or C fires. They work well on an electrical fire in that they do not leave a messy residue on delicate electrical equipment such as a dry chemical extinguishers would. The CO2 displaces the oxygen at the surface of the fire, effectively smothering the fire. However, the fire can re ignite once the CO2 gas dissipates if the ignition source has not been removed. The best places in your home for a C02? Kitchen, garage and office area. Do not use a Co2 in small confined areas of the home because oxygen gets displaced and possible suffocation could occur to the user.      


Types Of Fire Extinguishers

CALL US TODAY FOR SAME DAY SERVICE @ 321-751-0777 What is the best type of fire extinguisher to have for the home or car? There are many types of fire extinguishers designed for specific types of fires, however a 5 lb ABC dry chemical fire extinguisher will adequately protect homes and automobiles. Class A: This is suitable for cloth, wood, rubber, paper, various plastics, and regular combustible fires. It is usually filled with 2 1/2 gallons (9.46 litres) of pressurized water. Class B: This is suitable for grease, gasoline or oil-based fires is usually filled with a dry chemical. Extinguishers smaller than 6lbs (2.72kg) are not recommended. Class C: This is suitable for electrical fires caused by appliances, tools, and other plugged in gear. It can contain either halon or CO2. Halon 1211 and 1301 is very expensive and depletes the ozone layer, but it is being replaced by non-depleting agents such as FM200. Note that halon is now illegal in numerous jurisdictions. Class D: This is used for water-reactive metals such as burning magnesium and will be located in factories using such metals. It comes in the form of a powder that must cover the material to extinguish it. Class K: This contains a special purpose wet chemical agent for use in kitchen fires and deep fryers to stop fires started by vegetable oils, animal fats, or other fats started in cooking appliances.


Thanksgiving Holiday Safety Tips

Great article from NFPA on specific safety tips for Thanksgiving.......http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays/thanksgiving-safety   The kitchen is the heart of the home, especially at Thanksgiving. Kids love to be involved in holiday preparations. Safety in the kitchen is important, especially on Thanksgiving Day when there is a lot of activity and people at home.   Safety tips Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food. Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently. Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away. Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns. Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags. Keep knives out of the reach of children. Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child. Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet. Never leave children alone in room with a lit a candle. Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.


Holiday Fires

Facts about home holiday fires One of every three home Christmas tree fires are caused by electrical problems. Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires. A heat source too close to the tree causes roughly one in every six of Christmas tree fires. More than half (56%) of home candle fires occur when something that can catch on fire is too close to the candle. December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December, 11% of home candle fires began with decorations compared to 4% the rest of the year. Source: National Fire Protection Association